CURRENT INVENTORY IS SHOWN IN THE SMALL PICTURES JUST BELOW THIS TEXT!
(if a car is not pictured here, it has been sold)

Bugeye Sprite modern- day test track

Final preparations for departure

This is Mr Wellman’s Bugeye, just about ready to head back home to Pittsburgh. After 75 different restoration tasks, this car is nearly ready to depart. Soon, we’ll load it into an enclosed trailer and send it home.

Watch the video below to get a sense of our completion process. After weeks tweaking every system on the car, we spend several hours running through our pre-departure checklist, looking for anything we missed. Then, it’s time to hit the highway, which you will see in the video below.

A few items I didn’t mention in the video that you might want to know… no, I am not blasting Steely Dan in my ears while I drive… I am wearing superb noise canceling ear buds, which I really enjoy for convertible and motorcycle driving.

And the 0-60 time for this car (courtesy of our new GPS Speedometer) was about 16 seconds. I am not driving aggressively, so this is by no means a maximum performance test. But I can tell from driving lots of these cars that this amount of performance is just about right for a Spritely run with this particular configuration of a 1275 engine with 4:22 rear end.

Enjoy the video! And give us a call if you would like us to pick up your English car and make it wonderful!

Proper Bugeye Sprite front latch mechanism

Very few of the Bugeyes that arrive here have the front bonnet lock set-up correctly. Pieces are usually missing, nothing ever lines-up, and the latches almost never work. Let’s face it, the nose weighs so much that it isn’t going anywhere under normal circumstances. (I drove Gumby for 20 years before the car had a nose latch).

These worked, but weren’t pretty, and only hung on one bolt hole

But all bets are off if you crash. You want the nose to stay in place, so it can absorb energy and stay in place should you roll. The nose is a heavy object, and you want to make sure it is secured to the car. Thus every car that leaves our shop goes out into the world with a working nose latch. Rattles are reduced. And it’s just good craft.

You need the cones shown above to plug into your front frame rail. The locking pin moves horizontally to engage the new black plates. The pin is shown in the “locked” position above.

The yellow car shown here had a working mechanism but the locking plates were butchered. Holes were elongated, which made for a bonnet that bounced a bit even while latched. The customer agreed it would be nice to repair this old wound and so we installed new black lock plates as shown.

New lock plates installed

You can buy these pieces in our catalog if yours are missing. They are linked below.

Bonnet lock plates

Bonnet T lock handle

Bonnet lock rods

Bonnet locating pegs

Front frame horns

Original Bugeye Sprite owner’s responsibility

Here’s one of the documents that would come with your brand new Sprite…

Electric Bugeye evolution

FrogE #2 is taking shape. This is an electric conversion for a customer in Maryland. Here’s the car with batteries mocked-up. We have changed the battery chemistry and design for this car (from our first prototype), which should help make our forthcoming Sprite electric kits easier for customers to build themselves.


Below, you can see the cells laid out in the engine bay for 100 mile range and optimal weight balance. An additional tray of batteries will be mounted under the trunk floor in the place of the fuel tank. In this way, we replicate the near 50/50 weight distribution that makes a Bugeye such a delight to drive.

Below you can see how we receive the batteries from the manufacturer. All 50 cells power each Sprite conversion. We’ll share more photos as this build progresses!

Bugeyeguy transformed

Four years ago, we chose a derelict Quonset hut as our home. Now, it’s a proud and restored shiny tin can. We are almost done with this massive restoration, and we’re getting pretty excited.

The goal was to create a bright, fun place to work that would communicate our passion for blending old and new. I wanted our building to express our commitment to the fabrication of solutions, because every auto restoration is exactly that. The building also needed to communicate that we take what we do very seriously and leave no detail to chance.

Along the way, we were often tested. There were many problems to solve to deliver a building that matched the vision. Like an old British car, our hut occasionally put up a fight.

Now, this upper level will become more of a showroom and less of a work space

This week, we completed the glass dividing wall between the old and new building. The wall allows the separation of ground level lifts and upper level showroom and office space. We wanted our workshop in the new building to feel of a gourmet kitchen, with proud chefs behind the glass. And the glass wall allows the light from the bright skylit addition into the main hall.

Glass wall is my favorite part of the whole project. Everyone worked so hard to build all the pieces of this renovation. For example, Mike and Kenny must have cut, chamfered and stained 500 pine boards for the addition ceiling as shown in the photo below. Only when the glass was put in place did the details really shine through the entire space. You can now see both the 60 year old steel ceiling and the new pine ceiling from every vantage point in the combined structure. When you turn the corner to see this wall of glass and everything in front and behind it, you know you have arrived someplace very special. We strive to make our cars and our parts very special too.

This week, we also erected a new four post lift that will replace the I-beam ramps we’ve used for the past four years.

New glass overhead door to the right of the image!
The first cars to ride the new lift… Mr Preston’s “Mellow,” ready for pre-departure test drives, and Mr Allen’s Iris blue Bugeye, ready for testing after extensive mechanical restoration

It’s hard to believe the image below is of the same building wall. Just two years prior, there was no addition, and we moved cars into the building on this gravel path up two discarded steel I-beams. These ramps saw a lot of Bugeye tire prints over the years and served us well.

Pack ’em in! The Sprites are passing through what became the glass wall in the photos above.
Here are the ramps on dirt while the foundation was was being readied for the addition you see above

Construction was just starting on the addition in the photo below. You might not know that the same guy who sewed the quilted custom leather seats for Gumby also built this addition, almost single-handedly.

Thank you Kenny!

Pre-fab building addition, some assembly required

Below is a short drive video in our Bugeye Goldie. Near the end of the video at about 2:35, you can see me drive through the addition while it was very much under construction. I enjoyed seeing how far our building project has come, and I hope you will too!

Thank you for your support of all of our endeavors, that support has helped us to grow. We want to be your primary Sprite parts supplier, and your go-to source for restoration and sales as well. Now that our facility is almost done, we can really shine.

Super Trick Little ’60 Bugeye Sprite for sale.

Here’s a very special Sprite.

This is a very cool looking Sprite called “Goldie.” She’s a 948 engine, four-speed car, with drum brakes and has been completely rebuilt with maximum cosmetic “wow” factor. The car is lowered and looks mean!

Below is a video drive of the car from December 2017 when we had just completed building the car. You’ll notice just one Brooklands screen in place, and no head pillow yet…

We bought it a few years ago in pieces and completely restored it and then sold it to a customer who had us upgrade a number of components. For example, we added a custom roll bar and head pillow, hardura non-carpet floor covering, custom tonneau with color matched stitching, performance exhaust and front anti-roll bar. We also added twin Brooklands wind screens and amber Sebring driving lights, which are activated by a toggle switch on the dashboard.

The most recent owner further customized the car and added the racing fuel filler cap, racing lap belts, racing roundels and custom black paint on the license plate light. The roundels are decals and can be removed, as can the speed shop decal on the back and the nuts sticker on the dash. But I like the hot rodder style and fun, so we left all the stickers in place. The new owner can decide to leave them or have them removed. The racing stripes and rocker panels are painted black, so these will stay.

The car is super solid throughout, as the floors have been repaired with factory floor pans. There is no rust. And she is a joy to drive, tons of fun, with a sweet exhaust note.

The little 948 engine packs a punch. The car is a joy to drive and a fun tribute to the era when Sprites were not too precious to be customized. The next steward can take it even further, or enjoy this fun car just how it sits. Call or email to discuss adopting Goldie! PS the car is titled as a 1961, but we all know that no Bugeyes were made in 1961, it was merely first registered in that year.

Contact us at David@bugeyeguy.com or call (203)-208-0980 during business hours

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