CURRENT INVENTORY IS SHOWN IN THE SMALL PICTURES JUST BELOW THIS TEXT!
(if a car is not pictured here, it has been sold)


OEW tribute Bugeye

This is a mean, lowered, five speed/front disk/1275 Bugeye that we’ve been building. It’s almost done.

I am really happy with this build. The car is a tribute to Olde English white, THE quintessential British sports car color. Original white cars frequently arrived w/black seats with white piping. We took that color theme to the next level.

The wheels underline the black and white contrast. Our hardura interior mats are French stitched with white thread. And the dashboard is accented with twin thin white borders for a more elegant level of trim.

Now for the windshield… what’s your preference… Brooklands or regular full size?

We’ll have more pictures next week!

Four-post double Bugeye lift

Space is always at a premium in our shop. Even with our new addition, we still have too many cars and not enough space. As a partial solution we have invested in three new four post lifts, and for this lift pictured below, Ken welded-on two extensions, so that this 8000 pound lift can now raise two Bugeyes at once.

Below you can see the piece of angle iron he bolted to the edge of the lift. To that, he welded several lengths of heavy angle iron.

Next, he boxed in the new platforms and then welded on steel diamond plate. You can see one finished lift extension below.

And here you can see two Bugeyes sharing the lift, nose to nose. The lighter tail end overhangs the original deck and is supported by the extension.

We’ll build a second one like this during the coming week, which will allow us four in the air and four underneath… a Bugeye eight-pack!

Two Bugeyes to go

We are the Hotel California of Car shoppes. Sprites check in all the time and they never leave. That’s because it takes time for us to sort out cars on which we put our name. Our cars are very carefully vetted.

Once they come back from their final test drive and everything works with no strange noises and no issues, then they pass through our pre-departure check list. This list is a describes a stem to stern check over of anything that might need a final tightening before we send the car on its way. The PDI also has us double check anything that has broken on prior customer cars in the past. This is our last chance to locate anything out of the ordinary. Only after this process is complete is the car ready to be loaded into a trailer and take on the world.

Two departures in one day represents quite an accomplishment, worthy of celebration with a (blog) post.

In the foreground is Mr Preston’s Bugeye “Mellow.” This car got polished cockpit trim before departure, for a final cosmetic indulgence (see post below).

In front above is Mr Wellman’s blue bugeye you saw in a previous video. It was ready to depart shortly after that drive. But the second gear synchro was weak, and the owner decided to splurge on a Ford five speed transmission. Out came the engine, and the car was transformed to the next level. Now they are both on their way in an enclosed trailer, shown below.

A word about Ford vs Datsun five speeds. Full disclosure, I have Datsun five speeds in two of my own Bugeyes. I love the set up. But for customers, I am very much against them because we have had many problems with them. We find the Ford Transmission to be much more robust. We have not had one failure of the Ford product, while we have had several Datsun gear boxes with problems, clutch problems, and parts availability issues. You’ll pay more for the Ford Five speed, but you’ll only install it once, and it will last you for the life of your car.

You can read more about our Ford kit here.

Bugeye Sprite Tailor

We have a gifted tailor on staff. While he refuses to shorten my trousers, he does make a mean tonneau. We just bought him a double needle sewing machine, which he is putting to good use on all sorts of projects.

If you are unfamiliar, this machine moves two parallel threads, and affords lots of new creative possibilities. You can see the twin spools feeding the machine in the photo above. Below, you can see twin needle stitching on a stunning black and red short tonneau he made for a red car recently. Notice the single row on the outer trim and twin rows around the steering wheel pouch.

Below, you can see Ken fitting the steering wheel pouch that will be sewn to the tonneau above. Wheel size matters.

Below, you can see the template for the custom double needle black dashboard cover with white contrasting thread. This “one of a kind” dash is for the black and white Bugeye we are building now. That car is Olde English White, with black dash with white stitching in the black hardura floor mats, and blacked out wheels, on a sharp white body. We’re putting in a five speed and 1275 now as we build another Super Sprite!

Stay tuned for more pictures!

And if you would like your own custom short tonneau hand made in our shoppe, please click here.

Bugeye Sprite modern- day test track

Final preparations for departure

This is Mr Wellman’s Bugeye, just about ready to head back home to Pittsburgh. After 75 different restoration tasks, this car is nearly ready to depart. Soon, we’ll load it into an enclosed trailer and send it home.

Watch the video below to get a sense of our completion process. After weeks tweaking every system on the car, we spend several hours running through our pre-departure checklist, looking for anything we missed. Then, it’s time to hit the highway, which you will see in the video below.

A few items I didn’t mention in the video that you might want to know… no, I am not blasting Steely Dan in my ears while I drive… I am wearing superb noise canceling ear buds, which I really enjoy for convertible and motorcycle driving.

And the 0-60 time for this car (courtesy of our new GPS Speedometer) was about 16 seconds. I am not driving aggressively, so this is by no means a maximum performance test. But I can tell from driving lots of these cars that this amount of performance is just about right for a Spritely run with this particular configuration of a 1275 engine with 4:22 rear end.

Enjoy the video! And give us a call if you would like us to pick up your English car and make it wonderful!

Bugeyeguy transformed

Four years ago, we chose a derelict Quonset hut as our home. Now, it’s a proud and restored shiny tin can. We are almost done with this massive restoration, and we’re getting pretty excited.

The goal was to create a bright, fun place to work that would communicate our passion for blending old and new. I wanted our building to express our commitment to the fabrication of solutions, because every auto restoration is exactly that. The building also needed to communicate that we take what we do very seriously and leave no detail to chance.

Along the way, we were often tested. There were many problems to solve to deliver a building that matched the vision. Like an old British car, our hut occasionally put up a fight.

Now, this upper level will become more of a showroom and less of a work space

This week, we completed the glass dividing wall between the old and new building. The wall allows the separation of ground level lifts and upper level showroom and office space. We wanted our workshop in the new building to feel of a gourmet kitchen, with proud chefs behind the glass. And the glass wall allows the light from the bright skylit addition into the main hall.

Glass wall is my favorite part of the whole project. Everyone worked so hard to build all the pieces of this renovation. For example, Mike and Kenny must have cut, chamfered and stained 500 pine boards for the addition ceiling as shown in the photo below. Only when the glass was put in place did the details really shine through the entire space. You can now see both the 60 year old steel ceiling and the new pine ceiling from every vantage point in the combined structure. When you turn the corner to see this wall of glass and everything in front and behind it, you know you have arrived someplace very special. We strive to make our cars and our parts very special too.

This week, we also erected a new four post lift that will replace the I-beam ramps we’ve used for the past four years.

New glass overhead door to the right of the image!
The first cars to ride the new lift… Mr Preston’s “Mellow,” ready for pre-departure test drives, and Mr Allen’s Iris blue Bugeye, ready for testing after extensive mechanical restoration

It’s hard to believe the image below is of the same building wall. Just two years prior, there was no addition, and we moved cars into the building on this gravel path up two discarded steel I-beams. These ramps saw a lot of Bugeye tire prints over the years and served us well.

Pack ’em in! The Sprites are passing through what became the glass wall in the photos above.
Here are the ramps on dirt while the foundation was was being readied for the addition you see above

Construction was just starting on the addition in the photo below. You might not know that the same guy who sewed the quilted custom leather seats for Gumby also built this addition, almost single-handedly.

Thank you Kenny!

Pre-fab building addition, some assembly required

Below is a short drive video in our Bugeye Goldie. Near the end of the video at about 2:35, you can see me drive through the addition while it was very much under construction. I enjoyed seeing how far our building project has come, and I hope you will too!

Thank you for your support of all of our endeavors, that support has helped us to grow. We want to be your primary Sprite parts supplier, and your go-to source for restoration and sales as well. Now that our facility is almost done, we can really shine.

Contact us at David@bugeyeguy.com or call (203)-208-0980 during business hours