CHECK OUT OUR SELECTION OF PREPARED BUGEYES (AND NON-BUGEYES) FOR SALE BELOW!

One wicked tube full of Bugeye Sprites

Rear addition, February 2018

We have been working very hard, not just on the cars, but also on our building. We are expanding, and we are not doing so in the conventional way. Why? Because this is supposed to be fun. It’s about passion. And if our home is a dump, well, there wouldn’t be much passion or fun present. Sure we could have torn-down our Quonset hut and built something square, but if you love the two frog eyes on the hood of your car as much as I, you too would dream in curves, and thus our hut is well, Buggy. Curved. Bugeye-like.

Here’s the front facade when we moved-in in 2015.

Front facade, July 2017

As if a formerly run-down Quonset hut restoration wasn’t enough, we added a funky expansion structure with a similar curve, so the two round structures would play nicely. It has skylights, radiant heating in the floor and is at ground level, which allows a pleasant work space and faster departures and arrivals than our current structure which is four feet above grade. We’ll use the current building for more of a display space, and the new building will provide more storage and better work space than what we have now. This expansion will allow us to do more… and to do it even better.

One of the challenges of a bolt-together building is water leaks, and while we have minimized the issue, we still have a few, and thus we needed an internal skin that would allow any leaks to penetrate, with minimal damage. We’ll keep sealing the roof and striving for water-tight, but like the oil sump of a Bugeye, in spite of the best intentions, they are seldom leak-free.

And so we designed a slat ceiling, that would look great and breathe well, that would drain if needed, and would have components we could replace if they got water-stained. It was a smart solution, until we set out to mill the first 360 Eastern pine boards, and stain them, and poly them… well, this is taking longer than we had hoped.

BUT

Look at the awesome results…. one of the greatest gifts of employing great fabricators is that they love to make things, and while our crew is mostly hard at work on vehicle restorations, there is also time each week to make our expanded home spectacular. With the help of Mike (our now full time carpenter), and a host of other sub contractors and suppliers, our ceiling continues to line-up just right.

Now for the next 500 boards!

How we prepare Bugeye Sprites for delivery

I love my job! Even in January, it’s fun to field-test Bugeyes before they ship to new homes.

We were particularly busy this week preparing the four Bugeyes we recently sold (Booker, Marco, Mitchell and Becky). We spent the week combing through the cars to eliminate any kinks before departure. You can see these cars out on the road in the video below, as I conduct final tests.

All of our cars go through a roughly five-hour pre-departure inspection on the lift and then a lot of miles on the road. We complete an exhaustive checklist to make sure that either everything works, or that the customer knows what doesn’t work and has the option of having us fix it. Our partnership with the client starts when the car is sold, and we work together to make sure the product that leaves our building matches expectations. This has been the cornerstone of our business, and we have applied this formula now to more than 200 Bugeye Sprites that we have shipped to new homes.

Booker and Mitchell await road tests in our new addition! Note the new spray foam insulation! It’s warmer now!

People sometimes ask if we have a slow season, but we are busy all year long, and so even in January, I am out road testing the cars to make sure I am comfortable signing off on their departure. I sometimes have to wait for rain to wash off any salt on the roads, but one big benefit of living on the Connecticut shoreline is that are winters are relatively mild and year-round driving is quite doable. We leave the tops off since it makes service much easier, but with good gloves and a hat, convertible winter driving for short trips is not a problem.

Almost every one of our cars is customized after sale to meet the particular needs of the new owner. Thus the green Bugeye “Marco” is being set up for a lot of highway use with a lower rear end ratio and five-speed transmission because the customer has asked for these modifications to suit his lifestyle. Not all of our customers need this level of customization. In fact, the silver car “Booker” needed only new shocks, headlight dipswitch and carburetor gaskets before departure. The black car “Becky” is being set-up with a five-speed too, but this is more for ease of use on short trips given the fully synchronized first gear.

Becky is also getting a rear main seal upgrade while the engine is out-that customer liked the idea of investing in a well-sealed engine while it was out of the car for the five-speed conversion, so here you can see a photo of the back of the engine after this upgrade. We have found that many of the cars leak at the oil pump “dog dish” cover on the back plate. If you look closely, you can see that we have removed, cleaned and re-soldered that metal cover to ensure that it won’t leak. You can clearly see the rear main seal upgrade in place, which adds the large red lip seal around the back of the crankshaft to help keep oil from leaking out the back of the engine. This is a chronic problem on all classic British cars, but especially common on 948 Bugeyes, which used a scroll to sling oil back into the engine, and it never worked terribly well. These two upgrades shown should make this particular engine much more leak-free. If you ever take out your engine, make sure the culprit for oil leaks is not the oil pump cover, because the rear seal is only part of what needs to be right. You can also see a picture here of Russ preparing the front of the engine for a re-seal as well.

Becky’s new short tonneau is now complete, in off-white for the heat it will face when the car arrives in Phoenix. You can see how Ken beautifully fit the tonneau around the roll bar, first with a template, and then with velcro to keep the cockpit weather-tite.

All the cars moved forward this week, ever closer to departure, just waiting for one more test drive before our network of enclosed shippers loads and delivers these babies to their new homes!

Phoenix, Portland, DC… We prepare three Bugeye Sprites for three different regions and customers


We are readying three different cars this week for customers in distinct regions around America. Each customer has specific requirements. In the video below, you can see what we have been up to this week, as we ready these vehicles for their new homes.

Bugeyeguy Evolution

The cars just keep on lining-up.



And so, after extensive dialogue with Bodhi regarding this situation, we have decided to expand. He assured me that digging, while messy, always produces great results.

During the past six months we have completely ripped-apart our nice little back yard with progress in mind. More space creates lots of new opportunities, and we are on the case.
In this photo album below, you can see how we took out a few trees, leveled the property, poured the footings, installed radiant heat, poured the slab, and now, throughout the month of October, we will be erecting the new structure. Our new corrugated steel arched building will tuck behind our 1951 Quonset hut. Throughout the fall, we will be fitting out this new facility with even better resources to serve our customers.

We’ll have more lifts, more storage and more efficient work space, all of which will help us to do an even better job. We’ve already completed our new rear staircase, which helps us access our giant parts inventory faster, directly from the shop floor.

Thanks to all of you for your support: for helping us place more than 200 Bugeyes in new homes, for choosing us to be your parts supplier, for trusting us to sort out and make-wonderful your sports cars. Thanks to our incredible staff for embracing challenges on a daily basis. Thanks to (sports car lover) Jeff Hoover of Tappe Architects for helping us figure out what goes where.


And a special thanks to you, for being the best customers in the classic car universe!

Bugeye Sprite Tractor-Pull

When a wounded ’67 MGB with a seized engine arrived at our facility, we had a choice-either push the car up our ramps to our shop level (four feet up), or enlist the help of a powerful workhorse residing inside. This particular horse has a broken fuel pump and needed to be fed fuel with a tin-can IV drip… but nonetheless, the MGB was still small work for the mighty Bugeye.

And BTW, the MGB was able to drive out under it’s own power, its engine now installed…

Pizza-powered Bugeye Sprite

I got the following email this week from a Mr Taylor:

“Thanks for sending the price list. I’ve watched a few of your videos. Can a pizza fit behind the seats?”

We set out to answer this question, as shown in the video below:

Contact us at David@bugeyeguy.com or call (203)-208-0980 during business hours