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(if a car is not pictured here, it has been sold)


Bugeye Sprite-Will I fit?

This is Mary, the proud new owner (with her husband Frank, he might also get to drive it) of our Bugeye “Vanilla.” It is always really fun for us to turn new people onto these cars, and clearly, here we have a great new member(s) of the tribe.

Frank and Mary came to visit so we could confirm fitment. She’s 5’1 and the seat was low for her. You can see in the photo above that her head was initially a bit low in the windshield glass (note the gap between her head and the top of the windshield).

In the photo above you can see the gap with Mary seated on our more firm seat pillow. We removed the less dense foam from the seat pan and recovered our more comfortable and slightly taller seat foam with the red and white seat cover. Now, Mary is ready to go.

Original Bugeye seat foam (left) next to our thicker replacement foam (right)

The original Sprite seat base foams are easy to identify since they are chambered, with large holes on the back of the pillow. Our replacement might be thicker than the original, although we will never know how much that original foam has compacted in 60 years-perhaps they were once this thick! But the foam we use is very dense, and thus more comfortable, more shock absorbing, and can help shorter folks fit the car. If you would like one (or two) of these thicker pillows, you can order them by clicking here.

Another great nice upgrade we provided was to weld extensions on the driver’s seat tracks. With this enhancement, the seat can slide forward far enough for Mary, and also slide fully back for Frank. We might have moved the mounts forward for Mary, but this would have compromised the length for Frank. Extending the tracks allows the best of both worlds, and a greater range of possibilities. We also left the slightly less dense foam in the passenger seat, so Frank can switch seat bottoms when he drives the car if he feels that Mary’s pillow is too high.

Black track extensions above allow the seat to slide further forward than stock

Our car #248 is now ready to go, with custom seating given the needs of the new owners. This one proves yet again that Sprites can accommodate a wide range of users, despite it’s small overall size. Our tallest customer yet is 6’4″ and with Mary at 5’1,” here’s further proof that just about anyone can fit into a Frogeye.

Bugeye Sprite tow dolly long term test

In case you were wondering if you can tow a Bugeye on a tow dolly, Ken has 9,000 miles under his belt towing this car behind his motor home (shown below), without issue.

This month, Ken and Sandy piled their dogs, luggage and a bird into their RV and drove from North of Chicago to our door, for a new windshield and rear disk brake upgrade, done while they slept in our front lot!

A rear disk brake upgrade ends leaking rear wheel cylinder issues forever! (click to read more in our catalog)

Once the car was complete, the crew headed south to the Florida Keys with their much improved Bugeye in tow.

Many have asked if you need to remove the driveshaft to flat tow a Bugeye, and even UHAUL tells you this is required, but that seems to only apply to automatic transmissions. Ken reports no issues, after towing this Sprite all over America, driveshaft in place, without trouble.

Ready to head South for the winter!

Tires for classic sportscars

How old are your tires?

This one is probably 30 years old (it did pop)

I’ve seen recommendations that we should all change our tires every seven years. But we all stretch it, and with good reason. Even if you drive your classic car 1000 miles per year, after 7000 miles, that’s hardly noticeable wear for a modern 13 inch tire that is probably good for 40,000 miles or more. And there are plenty of Sprite drivers out there who just noodle around town, so why bother changing your tires if you never go above 40 mph?

Why leave your tires to chance? Roll with “Fate-O!” (these old tires came to us on a Sprite)

One of the great advantages of driving so many identical cars over the same roads day after day is that I get to experience lots of subtle differences between cars. More and more I am convinced that fresh rubber really makes a BIG difference. I have been to one of the largest tire dumps in America (tire pond) and I hate to see more tires discarded. But old tires provide less traction. Old tires don’t brake as well. Or corner as well. And in an panic situation, this could be particularly important. More importantly, new rubber provides more ride comfort for the occupants. Sure, comfort is not a priority when setting off in a Bugeye, but there is a noticeable difference when new supple rubber. It’s more compliant, and makes the car feel a lot better.

Sprites need all the suspension they can get, and tire sidewalls help provide that suspension. This is one reason I am very much against any tire with a profile lower than 70…. 60 or 50 series tires may look cool, but you sacrifice any cushion the sidewall provides. If you lost a dental filling on your last Sprite drive, you need higher profile (or new) tires.

Lots of original Sprite steel wheels are bent too. These Minilights repros are strong and round and well worth considering whenever you invest in new rubber…


Sure, everything else has to be set up right, and your shocks need to be working properly too. But don’t underestimate the importance of good rubber. Learn to read the date code on your tires so you can stop lying about their age. The date code is a four digit code in an oval box on the sidewall, usually next to a DOT number. 3604 would mean the tire was built in the 36th week of 2004. 1815 is the 18th week of 2015, etc. The new tire at left is 0618, made February 2018 (click the photo to enlarge if needed). If you can only find a three digit number, you are way overdue… in 2000, this designation changed from three to four digits, so if you have only three digits in your date code, your tires are more than 18 years old. Rubber that old just can’t grip the asphalt the way you need it to.

Tires are cheap! Click here if you want to order a set today. We have 155 and 175 series. We also have new wheels available and can mount and balance your tires are wheels and ship them to your door. Click here for more info! And click here to add mounting and balancing…

Don’t do this to your Bugeye Sprite

We’ve seen quite a few broken windshield stanchions. This one lost its tip, a break likely caused from pushing the car from the windshield frame, or pulling oneself out of the car by the top of the frame.

Remember to be careful with any loads you apply to your Sprite windshield, as the pillars are not available new.

All about Bugeye Sprite Front bumpers

This photo depicts about the ugliest application of a front Bumper I have ever seen. This particular car wears a later sprite Bumper (which has the wrong shape for the front of a Bugeye) on a custom mount and it just looks wrong in every way. Correct front Mark 1 bumpers can look nice when done properly. In this post, I will share some basics about front bumpers on Bugeyes.

“The Egg”

First, a front bumper was optional on Mark 1 Sprites sold in the UK. However, every Bugeye bound for the US of A was shipped with a front bumper. That said, many (if not most) have been removed by now, for reasons I will get into below. Most importantly, there is no law of which I am aware that requires a front bumper on a classic vehicle. I often get that question… people fear that they will not be able to register their Sprite without a front bumper. That has not been an issue on the more than 225 cars we have sent to new homes and new states. Old cars are generally immune from this sort of safety standard (not that a Bugeye bumper provided much safety anyway).

Click “read more” for additional bumper information and pictures… [Read more…]

Don’t do this to your Bugeye Sprite-Part 3

This picture tells the story of time, and what happens as an immobile Bugeye is slowly digested by other non-mobile, non-British flotsam and jetsam.

Never place anything heavier than a feather on the back deck (or nose) of your Bugeye, as it is easy to flex, rumple and/or crease. When pushing these cars, make sure to push from the outer edges near the seams, or from the bumpers, to support your push without denting the rear deck or nose. It can take a lot of hours to make them smooth and fair during restoration once they get dented. It’s best to avoid the problem in the first place.

This is a car that has sat in one place for about 30 years. It’s now on its way to our shop (without the raised panel doors, baskets, and fluorescent light tube) to be made running and driving again.

Contact us at David@bugeyeguy.com or call (203)-208-0980 during business hours