CURRENT INVENTORY IS SHOWN IN THE SMALL PICTURES JUST BELOW THIS TEXT!
(if a car is not pictured here, it has been sold)


OEW tribute Bugeye

This is a mean, lowered, five speed/front disk/1275 Bugeye that we’ve been building. It’s almost done.

I am really happy with this build. The car is a tribute to Olde English white, THE quintessential British sports car color. Original white cars frequently arrived w/black seats with white piping. We took that color theme to the next level.

The wheels underline the black and white contrast. Our hardura interior mats are French stitched with white thread. And the dashboard is accented with twin thin white borders for a more elegant level of trim.

Now for the windshield… what’s your preference… Brooklands or regular full size?

We’ll have more pictures next week!

The world’s most reliable (and fun) Bugeye Sprite

Wipers work too! Photo Dom Milano

Above is Jeff in his blue Bugeye “Peggy,”, a car we prepared with a supercharger, rebuilt 1275 engine and five-speed transmission. We also performed about 100 additional improvements, to make the car as reliable as possible.

This is Jeff’s car, before it departed our shop, with supercharger installed.

Much to our delight, Jeff took the Amtrak train to our shop, jumped into the fully serviced car and drove it three hours to Boston, then got up the next morning and drove 145 miles to Lime Rock Park where he ran about 20 hot laps on Saturday in a driver school, drove to the hotel (about 40 miles roundtrip), back to the racetrack for another 20 laps of racing, then another 145 miles home to Boston.

Photo: Ed Hyman

Do you think the average Bugeye sold online or on an auction site can survive this sort of intense mixed use driving?

I doubt it.

After 246 Bugeyes through our building, we know what to look for, and what to change proactively to keep your British sports car on the road. Thanks, Jeff, for demonstrating that our processes work. Thanks for the drivable (and racing) testimonial!

If you’d like a supercharged Bugeye of your own, we have “Carmine” available, a car that would be equally at home on the track or at the golf course. You can see Carmine by clicking here…

Photo: Richard Campbell

Bugeye Sprite custom gauges

We have just completed further modifying our Bugeye “Goldie” for her new owner in Wisconsin. This is a custom Bugeye with a unique performance vibe. For the new owner “Gary,” we were tasked with taking the cockpit one step further.

Gary wanted more guages, but how to do this without detracting from the style of this particular car? We were lucky to locate a rare pair of vintage Smiths rally clocks for the dash and installed them on the dashboard as shown below.

The challenge with any modifications of this nature is to integrate the graphic style and type font so that the gauges blend together. These Smiths clocks have been built in the same era as the original gauges, and I love them for this reason.

We also built a custom center console for an ammeter and voltmeter under the dash. The challenge here was to keep the gauges away from the shift knob so they don’t get smashed by your knuckles in first and third gear. To accomplish this goal, we wanted to move the gauges forward of the edge of the dash yet still make them visible to the driver. So we built a custom metal console to fit the bill. It anchors easily to the flange on the body of the car at the top of the console.

We love the result so we made up a few and they’re available in black, red or blue. You’ll find them in our catalog where you can order yours by clicking here.

This is a custom welded metal piece wrapped in pebble grain vinyl. It holds two standard 52 mm gauges and also provides a storage cubby for a phone, flashlight, keys or dog treats. We also stock the ammeter and voltmeter shown in our catalog if you want to make your own electric system information command module!

Bugeye Sprite Tailor

We have a gifted tailor on staff. While he refuses to shorten my trousers, he does make a mean tonneau. We just bought him a double needle sewing machine, which he is putting to good use on all sorts of projects.

If you are unfamiliar, this machine moves two parallel threads, and affords lots of new creative possibilities. You can see the twin spools feeding the machine in the photo above. Below, you can see twin needle stitching on a stunning black and red short tonneau he made for a red car recently. Notice the single row on the outer trim and twin rows around the steering wheel pouch.

Below, you can see Ken fitting the steering wheel pouch that will be sewn to the tonneau above. Wheel size matters.

Below, you can see the template for the custom double needle black dashboard cover with white contrasting thread. This “one of a kind” dash is for the black and white Bugeye we are building now. That car is Olde English White, with black dash with white stitching in the black hardura floor mats, and blacked out wheels, on a sharp white body. We’re putting in a five speed and 1275 now as we build another Super Sprite!

Stay tuned for more pictures!

And if you would like your own custom short tonneau hand made in our shoppe, please click here.

Gas-powered 1275 VS electric Bugeye Sprite

Our electric Bugeye is now ready for its new interior, and we are very excited. The car is sorted and exceeds our expectations mechanically, and now we can make it look stunning. Stay tuned!

If you have been following this project, you know I am in love with it, mainly because it is smooth and consistent. I get the feeling that it will be just as smooth and consistent in 100,000 miles. This is a big service interval in the British classic car world, where the life span of a newly rebuilt 948 engine may only be about 50,000 miles.

This week, I wanted to share two videos… the first is of a gas powered Bugeye with a newly rebuilt 1275 engine and five speed Ford transmission. We installed this upgraded powertrain for Len from New Jersey, and finished it with the same anthracite wheels and new tires you see on the electric Bugeye. Len’s car now tracks like an arrow and cruises beautifully at 70 mph, @ about 3300 RPMs in fifth gear.

The sound is just about perfect, courtesy of our custom twin-tipped muffler. Zero-60 time is 15.27 seconds (stock 948 was reported to be 20.5 in 1958). By the way, I backed off a bit because of the truck bearing down on me, so this time is a bit slower than what is possible…

Next is “Sparky,”our electric prototype, with a 4:22 rear end. Zero to 60 time is 10.2 seconds, a full five seconds faster. It also gets to 60 in about half the distance, 530 feet vs 898 ft. The sound you might love in the prior video is completely missing. But I have come to love the electric motor sound too. It’s not a replacement for a sweet exhaust note, it’s just a different cool sound. In fact it makes me think back to black and white Flash Gordon television I used to watch as a kid. Whenever Flash jumped into Dr Zarkov’s rocket to go anywhere, the spaceship made an electric buzzing noise, and I think of Flash each time I take off…

The electric turns 4800 rpms at 75 mph. You might notice the that electric motor really comes on as the RPMs climb. We will next switch to a 4:55 rear end for even more off the line performance. This will raise the RPMs on the highway, but this electric motor doesn’t care the way our gas engines do. Load matters more than RPMs. Range is about 100 miles per full charge. This car is fit with a fast charger so it works at highway charging stations.

We look forward to the next electric conversion… if you have a Bugeye sitting on your property with a worn 948 engine and transmission, our electric direct drive conversion is an attractive option! Or, if you would prefer a rebuilt 1275 with a five speed, we have that kit in stock too! Call or email to get your car on our winter schedule! We can pick up your car anywhere in the country, even if it doesn’t run.

The next chilling chapter of the electric Bugeye Sprite

This was a busy week, with a full house of Bugeyes needing various repairs and restoration work. Our electric project is still a priority, and we made time to add a new radiator to our prototype electric car. This one is tiny, all it has to do is cool the controller, the brain that manages the batteries and motor.

Juice comes in, juice goes out! The AC Bugeye Electric motor controller, roughed-in place, with more wiring to still complete.


I know that the Bugeye Sprite is all about simplicity, and an electronic brain is exactly the antithesis of what the Bugeye is all about. But until further notice, I am hooked on the smooth and maintenance free/turn-key operation of an electric Bugeye. In addition, of the 19 Bugeyes in our building at the moment, the electric is by far the fastest of the bunch. So if we need to add a little cooling to keep the brains of the operation happy, I am more than willing to comply.

I thought you might find this story interesting, as it represents one more way in which we had to engineer a solution to a British car challenge. It turns out that the controller is smart enough to de-rate the power it will transmit to the motor if it gets too hot. You can still limp home, but you don’t get the full power that makes this vehicle so addictive. We set out to fix the problem once and for all so we added a liquid cooled chill plate under the controller.

The silver plate you see in the photo above sandwiches underneath the controller box. You can see the recesses that will carry the antifreeze under the aluminum case that houses the controller. The square O ring around the perimeter keeps the antifreeze in place. Two half inch hoses and a small pump allow the antifreeze to circulate to a small heat exchanger we fit alongside the batteries.

Now, the controller will stay much cooler, which will allow us to send more power to the rear wheels. And thus our car is almost ready for range testing. If the weather improves, we will be out driving the car throughout the balance of the month.

Contact us at David@bugeyeguy.com or call (203)-208-0980 during business hours